Category: Partnerships

NSA grant funds Korean language program for local high school students

This summer, as many as 20 students from across Dane County will be exploring Korean language and culture through the UW-Madison STARTALK Korean Language and Culture Academy. The STARTALK program, an initiative of the National Security Agency and National Foreign Language Center, seeks to increase the number of critical-need foreign language speakers through creative and engaging experiences. Continue reading

UW’s Tripp to lead team examining role of women in peace-building in Africa

An international team of experienced researchers will examine women’s role in peace-building in Africa, supported by $961,600 grant from the Carnegie Corporation of New York and the Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

Aili Mari Tripp

Aili Mari Tripp

 The two-year project, which begins July 1, will be administered by the Center for Research on Gender and Women at the University of Wisconsin–Madison and led by Aili Mari Tripp, UW–Madison professor of Political Science and Gender and Women’s Studies.

The project consortium also includes the Chr. Michelsen Institute in Bergen, Norway, and Isis-Women’s International Cross-Cultural Exchange, in Kampala, Uganda.

The researchers include scholars and women’s rights activists from Nigeria, Somalia, Sudan, Uganda, Norway, United States and Finland. They will be conducting research in Somalia, Algeria, northern Nigeria, South Sudan, and Sudan. Continue reading

UW campus hosts 25 young African leaders

The 25 young African leaders who have come to the University of Wisconsin–Madison campus for a six-week academic and leadership institute represent a variety of fields, including medicine, public health, law, education and community activism.

Sicily Mburu

Sicily Mburu

Sicily Mburu, of Kenya, has served as a medical doctor in her country’s Ministry of Health and participated in projects aimed at strengthening HIV/AIDS and maternal health systems. She wants to learn how to use mobile technology to assess health needs, allowing for cost-effective, high-impact interventions.

Gnenegnimin Eli Yeo

Gnenegnimin Eli Yeo

Gnenegnimin Eli Yeo, from Côte d’Ivoire, aspires “to create a center that will train and equip young men and women to create their own businesses and impact the community.”

They are among the 13 women and 12 men, from 19 countries, who have come to UW–Madison through the Mandela Washington Fellowship for Young African Leaders, sponsored by the U.S. Department of State and hosted here by the African Studies Program. Continue reading

Fulbright: Drewal to work with, learn from metal artists in Morocco

“In the beginning, there was no word, only sensations,” says Henry John Drewal.

“The senses are crucial to understandings of the arts, as well as the formations of persons and cultures, and histories,” explains Drewal, Evjue-Bascom Professor of Art History and Afro-American Studies at the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

Henry J. Drewal

Henry J. Drewal

Drewal began to discover the central role of the senses in the arts in the 1960s. While in Nigeria teaching French and English and organizing arts camps as a Peace Corps volunteer, he apprenticed himself to a Yoruba sculptor, an experience that proved to be transformative.

He followed up in 1978 with mask-making apprenticeship with another Yoruba sculptor in Nigeria, and the Gelede mask he created still dances in annual festivals.

Through these experiences, he says, “I gained insights into Yoruba artistic concepts, not only in discussing them with artists and observing them as they emerged from the creative process, but also in attempting to achieve them in my own carving under the tutelage of Yoruba artists.”

He adds, “In other words, my own bodily, multi-sensorial experience was crucial to a more profound understanding (oye) of Yoruba art, and the culture and history that shape it. This process of watching, listening, carving, making mistakes, being corrected by example, and trying again, was a transformative sensorial experience for me.”

Drewal has received a 2016-17 senior Fulbright Scholar award to continue exploring African art through what he calls Sensiotics – “the study of the multi-sensorial dimensions of the arts, both in the making and the reception of the arts by body-minds.” Continue reading

International Division, IRIS award seed grants for interdisciplinary research

Six interdisciplinary research projects that blend place-based scientific inquiry with international expertise have been awarded incubator grants by the International Division and the Institute for Regional and International Studies (IRIS) at the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

These projects focus on Africa, South Asia, Eurasia, and Latin America, in fields as diverse as public health, child development, civil engineering, climate science, archaeology, genetics, virology, and environmental studies.

Offered this year for the first time, the grants are aimed at bringing together faculty in STEM fields who are conducting place-based research abroad with experts from regional and area studies centers within IRIS.

“These grants are based on the idea that scientific inquiry will improve through collaboration with regional experts, while area specialists will benefit from working with colleagues in the physical, biological, and quantitative social sciences,” says Richard Keller, associate dean of the International Division.

Funding for these awards, of up to $50,000 each, comes from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and other International Division funds. Continue reading

Médicins sans Frontières veteran, UW Zika panel headline Global Health Symposium

The 12th annual Global Health Symposium at the University of Wisconsin–Madison will feature a keynote address by a Médicins sans Frontières (Doctors Without Borders) veteran and a Zika Virus Panel that will highlight how researchers at UW–Madison are contributing to understanding and stopping the virus.

The 2106 symposium, hosted by the Global Health Institute with support from the UW–Madison International Division and Lectures Committee, will be held Wednesday, March 30, starting at 4:30 p.m., in the Health Sciences Learning Center, 750 Highland Ave. The symposium is free and open to the public. Registration is requested.

“The Global Health Symposium is an opportunity for campus and the community to experience UW’s response to the complex and interlinked determinants of health and disease,” says GHI Director Jonathan Patz. “I am especially excited about our Zika panelists, who are on the front lines of innovative and immediate responses that will benefit human and animal health.” Continue reading

Peace Corps Week: Get an inside perspective

Curious about the Peace Corps?

Perhaps you’ve read that the University of Wisconsin–Madison has produced nearly 3,200 Peace Corps Volunteers since 1961. And with 68 Badger alumni currently serving overseas, UW–Madison ranks second on the annual list of top-producing universities and colleges.

Peace Corps Week – Monday, Feb. 29 through Friday, March 4 – offers opportunities to learn about the Peace Corps and to talk with people who have served overseas. Continue reading

Russian language program for under-served youth receives grant

The University of Wisconsin–Madison has received $90,000 to support a pre-college program designed to introduce high school students from low-income and minority communities to Russian language and culture.

The 2016 STARTALK award to UW–Madison’s Center for Russia, East Europe, and Central Asia (CREECA) and Department of Slavic Languages and Literature provides support for the Pushkin Summer Institute, which is now entering its fifth year.

The Pushkin Summer Institute (PSI) is an intensive, six-week residential pre-college program that introduces outstanding students from under-represented communities to Russian language and culture through the life and works of poet Alexander Pushkin. Continue reading