Category: Research

Yu receives funding to further solids research

Public and private funds will further the research efforts of Lian Yu, professor in the Pharmaceutical Sciences Division. These new projects range from the diversity of crystal forms, to the development of a nano-coating technology to produce low-cost stable amorphous formulations for global health, and the investigation of crystal nucleation in amorphous drugs and solid dispersions. These projects are supported by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, AbbVie, Eli Lilly, and the National Science Foundation.

Continue reading

UW’s Tripp to lead team examining role of women in peace-building in Africa

An international team of experienced researchers will examine women’s role in peace-building in Africa, supported by $961,600 grant from the Carnegie Corporation of New York and the Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

Aili Mari Tripp

Aili Mari Tripp

 The two-year project, which begins July 1, will be administered by the Center for Research on Gender and Women at the University of Wisconsin–Madison and led by Aili Mari Tripp, UW–Madison professor of Political Science and Gender and Women’s Studies.

The project consortium also includes the Chr. Michelsen Institute in Bergen, Norway, and Isis-Women’s International Cross-Cultural Exchange, in Kampala, Uganda.

The researchers include scholars and women’s rights activists from Nigeria, Somalia, Sudan, Uganda, Norway, United States and Finland. They will be conducting research in Somalia, Algeria, northern Nigeria, South Sudan, and Sudan. Continue reading

21 UW-Madison students awarded 2016-17 Fulbright U.S. Student Program grants

Twenty-one University of Wisconsin–Madison students have been awarded 2016-17 Fulbright U.S. Student Program grants, the U.S. Department of State and the J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board announced recently.

These students are among more than 1,900 U.S. citizens who will teach, conduct research, and provide expertise abroad for the 2016-2017 academic year through the Fulbright U.S. Student Program, the country’s flagship program for international exchange. Recipients of Fulbright awards are selected on the basis of academic and professional achievement, as well as record of service and leadership in their respective fields.

The program, which provides recipients with funding for a full academic year of study, research or assistant teaching abroad, is sponsored by the U.S. State Department’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, with significant contributions from participating governments and host institutions.

Since its establishment in 1946 under legislation introduced by the late U.S. Sen. J. William Fulbright of Arkansas, the Fulbright Program has given more than 370,000 students, scholars, teachers, artists, and scientists opportunities to study, teach and conduct research, exchange ideas, and contribute to finding solutions to shared international concerns.

UW–Madison has been among the leading U.S. research institutions producing Fulbright fellows and scholars. In the most recent round, UW–Madison produced 60 applications, with 34 chosen as semi-finalists, including 21 finalists, who have been offered and accepted grants. Continue reading

Cullinane receives distinguished honor for accomplishments, service

For the past 25 years, Michael Cullinane has stood at the heart of Southeast Asian Studies at the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

Cullinane has taught the introductory course in Southeast Asian Studies since 1991 and, in 2009, added a class on Southeast Asian Refugees of the Cold War. He has taught these courses for 48 semesters, with an average of 80 students per semester. Since 2006, the highly rated introductory course has been included in the programs for five First-year Interest Groups (FIGs).

Also since 1991, Cullinane has served as associate director of the Center for Southeast Asian Studies (CSEAS), one of UW–Madison’s seven U.S. Department of Education National Resource Centers (Title VI). He has been the primary author and manager of nine Title VI grants that have brought more than $11.7 million in program and fellowship funds to the university, as well as five Henry Luce Foundation grants totaling more than $1.8 million.

In addition, he is an internationally respected historian of Southeast Asia, particularly the Philippines – where his connection dates back to the late 1960s, as a teacher with the Peace Corps in Cebu City. His research has focused on 19th and 20th-century Philippine social, political, and demographic history.

For his accomplishments and long record of service, Cullinane has received numerous tributes, including being named an “Adopted Son of Cebu City” (2014) and receiving the Judith Craig Distinguished Service Award from UW–Madison’s College of Letters and Science (2015). This year, the UW–Madison campus has further honored him by adding the “distinguished” prefix to his faculty associate title. Continue reading

Fulbright: Drewal to work with, learn from metal artists in Morocco

“In the beginning, there was no word, only sensations,” says Henry John Drewal.

“The senses are crucial to understandings of the arts, as well as the formations of persons and cultures, and histories,” explains Drewal, Evjue-Bascom Professor of Art History and Afro-American Studies at the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

Henry J. Drewal

Henry J. Drewal

Drewal began to discover the central role of the senses in the arts in the 1960s. While in Nigeria teaching French and English and organizing arts camps as a Peace Corps volunteer, he apprenticed himself to a Yoruba sculptor, an experience that proved to be transformative.

He followed up in 1978 with mask-making apprenticeship with another Yoruba sculptor in Nigeria, and the Gelede mask he created still dances in annual festivals.

Through these experiences, he says, “I gained insights into Yoruba artistic concepts, not only in discussing them with artists and observing them as they emerged from the creative process, but also in attempting to achieve them in my own carving under the tutelage of Yoruba artists.”

He adds, “In other words, my own bodily, multi-sensorial experience was crucial to a more profound understanding (oye) of Yoruba art, and the culture and history that shape it. This process of watching, listening, carving, making mistakes, being corrected by example, and trying again, was a transformative sensorial experience for me.”

Drewal has received a 2016-17 senior Fulbright Scholar award to continue exploring African art through what he calls Sensiotics – “the study of the multi-sensorial dimensions of the arts, both in the making and the reception of the arts by body-minds.” Continue reading