Cullinane receives prestigious Goodman Prize

Michael Cullinane, associate director of the Center for Southeast Asian Studies and faculty associate in the Department of History, was recently named the 2017 recipient of the Grant Goodman Prize in Philippine Historical Studies.

Michel Cullinane and Paul Rodell

Michel Cullinane (left) and Paul Rodell (right), head of the Goodman Prize committee. Photo credit-Clemen Montero.

The award, which was established by a generous gift from Grant Goodman, professor emeritus, Department of History, University of Kansas, is awarded every two years for outstanding contributions to Philippine historical studies.

Cullinane’s contributions to the field of Philippine history are extensive. Remarks made at the award presentation in March at the annual meeting of the Association for Asian Studies in Toronto highlighted Cullinane’s publications, which explore “the transition from Spanish to American colonial rule” as viewed from Cebu, including topics such as political development, demographic change, revolutionary movements, Chinese mestizos, and biography. The Association for Asian Studies also lauded Cullinane for his leadership role with the Center for Southeast Asian Studies, his continued teaching responsibilities, and his work with Southeast Asia Programs at the University of Michigan and now UW–Madison.

“I am proud that Mike Cullinane was selected as recipient of the Goodman Prize,” said Guido Podestá, vice provost and dean of UW–Madison’s International Division. “Mike’s exuberance and passion for the history of the Philippines inspire students and faculty alike. His numerous publications have made a profound impact on the field and have strengthened the profile of the Center for Southeast Asian Studies at UW–Madison. The university is fortunate to have a scholar and educator of his caliber.”

One hallmark of Cullinane’s work has been his efforts to publish his findings through major university presses in the Philippines as a way to provide Filipino scholars, colleagues, and citizens with greater access to differing perspectives on Philippine history.

“I am in dialogue all of the time with Philippine scholars, and that’s the way I like it,” Cullinane said. “My goal is to draw them into the discussions we are having all over the world.”

Read more about Michael Cullinane’s exemplary work and honors.